Dietary Reference Intakes DRIs

To help you determine whether you are getting the right balance of nutrients, the government has established the dietary reference intakes (DRIs). The recommendations for vitamins and minerals exceed the average nutrition requirements of nearly all people, including athletes. The DRIs have several subgroupings:

  • Recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is the amount per day that should decrease the risk of chronic disease.
  • Adequate intake (AI) is used when an RDA cannot be determined for a particular nutrient.
  • Tolerable upper intake level (UL) is the highest level of a daily nutrient intake that is likely to pose no health risks. Above this U L, there is potential for increased risk.

Another measurement of intake you've likely seen is the daily value (DV), which is a compilation of DRIs used for food labels. The DV is intended to help people get a perspective on their overall dietary needs.

Recommended dieta ry

Daily value

allowance or

Nutrient

(on food labels)

adequate intake

Tolerable upper limit

Women

Men

Women & Men

Vitamin A (IU/day)

5,000

2,333

3,000

10,000

Vitamin C (mg/day)

60

75

90

2,000

Vitamin D (IU/day)

400

200 (<age 50)

200

2,000

400 (age 50-70)

400

600 (>age 70)

600

Vitamin E (IU/day)

30

15

30

1,000

Vitamin K (^g/day)

80

90

120

ND

Thiamin (mg/day)

1.5

1.1

1.2

ND

Riboflavin (mg/day)

1.7

1.1

1.3

ND

Niacin (mg/day)

20

14

16

35

Vitamin B6 (mg/day)

2

1.3

1.3

100

1.5 (>age 50)

1.7

Folate (^g/day)

400

400

400

1,000

600 (if pregnant)

Vitamin B (^g/day)

6

2.4

2.4

ND

Calcium (mg/day)

1,000

1,000

1,000

2,500

1,200 (>age 50)

1,200

Iron (mg/day)

18

18

8

45*

8 (postmenopause)

Zinc (mg/day)

15

8

11

*The upper limit does not apply to people who are taking an iron supplement as a short-term medical treatment for iron-deficiency anemia.

Source: Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes. Landover, MD: National Academy

ND = not determined

*The upper limit does not apply to people who are taking an iron supplement as a short-term medical treatment for iron-deficiency anemia.

Source: Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes. Landover, MD: National Academy

Press. 1998 200°. [continued)

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