Habitual Protein Intakes of Resistance Athletes

Hft2 Build 2wice the Muscle

Hft2 Build 2wice the Muscle

Get Instant Access

Protein

Reference

Participants

Roy et al., 1998118 Tarnopolsky et al., 199253 Lemon et al., 199298 Chesley et al., 199211 Tarnopolsky et al., 198865 Faber et al., 1986157 Short and Short, 1983154

N = 12 males (bodybuilders) 1.4

N = 12 males (bodybuilders) 1.6

N = 6 males (bodybuilders) 2.7

N = 76 males (bodybuilders) 2.4

N = 30 males (footballers) 2.5

N = 6 males (bodybuilders) 2.3

N = 56 males (footballers) 1.5

N = 8 females (bodybuilders) 2.8

Overall mean 2.0

18 16

14 17

17 22

18 20 18

15 37

Burke et al., 1991158 Burke and Read, 1988159 Kleiner et al., 1990160

Note: Values are mean (SD). Trained = weight trained four times per week for more than 2 years; % EIN = % energy intake.

TABLE 7.3

Habitual Protein Intakes of Male and Female Endurance Athletes

Protein

TABLE 7.3

Habitual Protein Intakes of Male and Female Endurance Athletes

Protein

Reference

Subjects

(g/kg/day)

(%

Carter et al., 2001155

N

= 8 males

1.7

16

N

= 8 females

1.3

17

Tarnopolsky et al., 199775

N

= 8 males

1.9

17

N

= 8 females

1.2

14

Tarnopolsky et al., 199574

N

= 7 males

1.8

15

N

= 8 females

1.0

12

Tarnopolsky et al., 198865

N

= 6 males

1.5

11

Phillips et al., 199341

N

= 6 males

1.9

15

N

= 6 females

1.0

13

Tarnopolsky et al., 199064

N

= 6 males

1.2

12

N

= 6 females

1.7

13

Saris et al., 198983

N

= 5 males

2.2

15

Deuster et al., 198687

N

= 51 females

1.6

13

Ellsworth et al., 1985156

N

= 13 males

2.1

14

Nelson et al., 198684

N

= 17 EUM

1.0

15

N

= 11 AMEN

0.7

15

Marcus et al., 198585

N

= 6 EUM

1.3

17

N

= 11 AMEN

1.0

15

Drinkwater et al., 198488

N

= 13 EUM

1.1

13

N

= 14 AMEN

1.2

16

Approximate mean

Males

1.8 (0.4)

14

Females

1.2 (0.3)

14

Note: Values are mean (SD). EUM = eumenorrheic; AMEN = amenorrheic females; EIN = energy intake.

Note: Values are mean (SD). EUM = eumenorrheic; AMEN = amenorrheic females; EIN = energy intake.

Partially adapted from Tarnopolsky, M., Nutrition, 20, 662, 2004.

In summary, the majority of strength and endurance athletes consume adequate protein and energy to meet their needs. Even when one takes into account the modest increases required by certain athletes (see below), most athletes are still above these levels. It appears that the human body homeostatically adapts to exercise by matching protein and energy intakes to cover any increase in demand from the activity in question. In some groups, there are extrinsic pressures to restrict intake for weight class or aesthetic reasons. In fact, certain groups may not even be attaining the recommended intake levels for sedentary individuals. Each athlete must be considered as an individual when determining the adequacy of dietary protein and energy intakes. The identification of the at risk groups above may help the nutritionist or coach to be aware of those who may need special nutritional counseling.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
The Bible of Body Building

The Bible of Body Building

Our lives have come a long way from the Stone Age, and we are quite thankful for the variousĀ  technological advancements that have brought us so far. We still have a long way to go, but the place we are right now is quite commendable too.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment