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Figure 6.3 The specific sequence of amino acids will determine the final three-dimensional structure of the protein. For instance, this one is starting to look a little like a spiral staircase.

Figure 6.3 The specific sequence of amino acids will determine the final three-dimensional structure of the protein. For instance, this one is starting to look a little like a spiral staircase.

Most proteins have a complex, three-dimensional design that enables each protein's unique function.

It will be the final structure that determines the functional properties of a protein. It is interesting that many proteins are actually all globbed up, somewhat like crumpled paper or loosely packed yarn. In fact, the names of some proteins, such as hemoglobin and immunoglobin, reflect their globbed (globular) nature. On the contrary, many proteins have more of a filament design, meaning that they are much longer than they are wide. Many of these proteins are like stretched-out coils. This is the case with collagen. In fact, numerous collagen proteins come together, side by side, to form a ropelike fibrous super-protein. Further still, it is possible for a protein to demonstrate both globular and filament attributes as is the case with muscle proteins actin and myosin.

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