What Nutrient Content Claims Mean

Free It's an amount so small that it probably won't have an effect on your body—for example,

"calorie-free," "fat-free," or "sodium-free." Other terms: "no," "zero," "without," "trivial source of," "negligible source of," "dietarily insignificant source of," "non" (nonfat only).

Low It's an amount specifically defined for each term, such as "low-calorie," "low-fat," or "low-

cholesterol." Other terms: "few," "contains a small amount of," "low source of," "low in," "little," "a little."

Reduced It's an amount describing a food with at least 25 percent less calories, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sugars, or sodium than a regular food. Look for information about the food it's being compared to. Other terms: "reduced in," "_% reduced," "fewer," "lower," "lower in," "less."

High It's an amount that's 20 percent or more of the Daily Value* for a nutrient—for example, "high in vitamin C" or "high-calcium." Other terms: "excellent source of," "rich in."

Good source It's an amount that's 10 to 19 percent of the Daily Value* for a nutrient—for example, "good source of fiber." Other terms: "contains," "provides."

More It's an amount that's 10 percent or more of the Daily Value*—for example, "more fiber" or

"more iron." You won't find it on meat or poultry products. Other terms: "enriched," "fortified," "added," "extra," "plus."

Light It's a food with a third fewer calories or 50 percent less fat than the traditional version. A

"low-calorie" or "low-fat" food with 50 percent less sodium might also be called "light." Other term: "lite." When "light" describes a product characteristic, such as "light brown sugar," it isn't a nutrient content claim.

Healthy It's a food that's low in fat and saturated fat, 60 milligrams or less cholesterol per serving,

480 milligrams or less sodium per serving, and at least 10 percent of the Daily Value per serving of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, iron, protein, or fiber. Fruits, vegetables and enriched cereal products can be labeled "healthy" without having 10 percent of the DV or more of these nutrients per serving. But they must meet low-fat, low-saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium criteria. A meal or main dish product must have 600 milligrams of sodium or less.

On seafood, meat, or poultry, look for:

Lean It's a food with less than 10 grams total fat, 4.5 grams or less saturated fat, and less than 95

milligrams cholesterol per 3-ounce (and per 100 grams) cooked serving.

Extra lean It's a food with less than 5 grams total fat, less than 2 grams saturated fat, and less than 95

milligrams cholesterol per 3-ounce (and per 100 grams) cooked serving.

*When compared with a label serving size of the traditional food.

There are no FDA-defined nutrient content claims for trans fat.

a single serving. That's a standard label serving size set by the government—not necessarily what you may consider one helping.

Nutrient content claims are optional. Many foods that meet the criteria don't carry these terms on the label. If you see a product with a nutrient content claim, use the % Daily Value to compare it to a similar food that doesn't carry a claim. For definitions of nutrient content claims, see "Label Lingo " on page 246. You'll find specific definitions in other chapters.

Green Smoothies

Green Smoothies

Do You Want To Know About A Magical Drink? A Drink That Is A Refreshing Twist For Every Party! A Drink That Is Full of Nutrients And Energy! Green Smoothies A Perfect Blend of Fruits And Green Vegetables!

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment