Ten Great Ways to Fiber Up

Are you ready to eat more fiber? These ten tips can put your day's food choices within range.

!. Eat a variety of foods. You'll benefit from a mix of fibers—both soluble and insoluble.

Need more strategies forfitting fiber in? Check here for "how-tos":

  • Shop for whole-grain and fiber-rich foods— see chapter !!.
  • Boost the fiber factor in your food preparation—see chapter !3.

How Much Fiber?

Dietary Fiber (g)

Serving Size* Calories Total

Fruits

Apple

1 medium

75

3.3

Applesauce

'/2 CUp

95

1.5

Apple juice

3/4 CUp

85

0.2

Banana

1 medium

105

3.1

Blueberries

V2 cup

40

1.7

Cantaloupe

'/2 CUp

30

0.8

Cherries

10

45

1.4

Dates (dried)

5

115

3.3

Figs (dried)

3

65

2.5

Fruit cocktail

'/2 CUp

55

1.2

Grapefruit

V2 medium

50

2.0

Grapes

V2 cup

55

0.7

Grape juice

3A cup

115

0.2

Kiwifruit

1 medium

45

2.3

Orange

1 medium

60

3.1

Orange juice

3A cup

80

0.4

Prunes (dried plums)

5

100

3.0

Peach

1 medium

40

1.5

Pineapple

'/2 cup

40

1.1

Pear

1 medium

95

5.1

Raisins

V4 cup

125

1.5

Raspberries

'/2 cup

30

4.0

Strawberries

V2 cup

25

1.7

Watermelon

V2 cup

25

0.3

getables, cooked

Asparagus

'/2 cup

20

1.8

Broccoli

V2 cup

25

2.6

Brussels sprouts

V2 cup

35

3.2

Corn

cup

90

2.2

Green beans

cup

20

2.0

Peas

V2 cup

65

4.4

Potato (mashed)

cup

120

1.6

Potato (baked, plain, with skin)

1 medium

160

3.8

Spinach

V2 cup

20

2.2

Sweet potato (baked, plain)

1 medium

105

3.8

Zucchini

'/2 cup

15

1.3

getables, raw

Carrot

1 medium

25

1.7

Celery

1 medium stalk

5

0.6

Cucumber (sliced)

cup

10

0.3

Lettuce (romaine)

1 cup

10

1.0

Mushrooms (sliced)

'/2 cup

10

0.3

Spinach

1 cup

5

0.7

Tomato

1 medium

20

1.5

gumes, cooked

Baked beans (vegetarian)

V2 cup

120

5.2

Garbanzo beans (chickpeas)

cup

135

6.2

Kidney beans

cup

110

6.5

Lentils

V2 cup

115

7.8

Navy beans

cup

125

9.6

Soybeans

cup

150

5.2

How Much Fiber? (continued)

Serving Size* Calories

Dietary Fiber (g) Total

Breads, grains, pasta Bagel

Barley, cooked Bread, whole wheat Bread, pumpernickel Bread sticks Bread, French Bread, white

Bun (hamburger or hot dog)

Pasta (cooked)

Pita

Rice, brown (cooked) Rice, white (cooked)

Breakfast cereals 100% bran Bran flakes Corn flakes Granola

Oatmeal (cooked) Puffed rice Raisin bran

Whole grain oats cereal

Snacks

Corn chips Hummus dip Peanuts (dry roasted) Popcorn (air-popped, plain) Pretzels

Sunflower seeds Walnuts

Added ingredients Flaxseeds, ground Gums Oat bran Psyllium Rice bran Seaweed Wheat bran Wheat germ

1 slice

1 slice

V2 cup

1 tbsp. 0.1 oz. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp.

90 95 70 65 40 90 65 60 110 80 110 120

85 95 100 140 75 115 90 105

140 45 215 95 110 185 190

  1. 8 3.0 1.9
  2. 7 0.3 1.0 0.6 0.5 1.3 0.7

*The serving sizes are standardized amounts often used in dietary guidance or for comparing similar foods.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2005. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18.

  1. Check the food label. Nutrition Facts on food labels can help you find foods with more fiber. Look for words such as "high in fiber" or "more fiber" on labels, too. See "Label Lingo: Fiber " earlier in this chapter to see what these claims mean. Spot fiber-rich ingredients on the ingredient list. Look for "bran," "whole grain," or "whole-wheat flour," too.
  2. Remember breakfast—a good time for fiber-rich foods. Besides bran cereal or another fiber-rich breakfast cereal, enjoy oatmeal, whole-bran muffins, whole-wheat waffles, or fiber-rich breakfast/cereal bars. Check food labels for a cereal with 5 or more grams of fiber per serving. Top with fruit for a little more fiber.
  3. Switch to whole grains—in bread, cereals, buns, bagels, crackers, and pasta, to name a few—at least some of the time. Make at least half of your Grains Group choices whole grain! For breads, that includes cornbread from whole, ground cornmeal; cracked wheat bread; oatmeal bread; pumpernickel bread; rye bread; and the perennial favorite, whole-wheat bread. Eat breads made with bran, too, such as bran muffins.
  4. Give brown rice a try sometimes, or mix half brown and half white rice.
  5. Plan to eat legumes (dry beans) several times a week. They're among the best fiber sources around. And they add flavor and texture to dishes.
  6. Fit in fruits and veggies: about 41/2 cups total a day, if you eat 2,000 calories a day. You might plan cooked vegetables and a salad for dinner, whole fruit and carrot sticks for lunch. How about a fruit or veggie snack?
  7. Enjoy fruits and vegetables with the edible skin on. With the skin, a medium potato has 3.8 grams of fiber. Skinless, it has less—2.3 grams. Also enjoy the flavor and crunch of edible seeds—for example, in all kinds of berries, kiwifruit, and figs. They, too, supply fiber.
  8. Choose whole fruit more often than juice. Fiber comes mainly from the peel and pulp; usually both are removed when juice is made. Juice usually has almost no fiber.
  9. "Fiberize" your cooking style. Substitute higherfiber ingredients in recipes, such as using part whole-wheat flour in baked food. And fortify mixed dishes with high-fiber ingredients, perhaps bran or oatmeal added to meat loaf or ground flaxseeds added to baked goods.

Refer to "Cooking Grain by Grain" in chapter 13.

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