Bodybuilders

protein (3.3 grams per kilogram of body weight vs. the RDA of 0.8 grams per kilogram) is safe for healthy individuals. More important, he knew that the increased protein load would result in a continuous increase in protein synthesis.

Joe started his transformation on May 12, 1994. His body weight was 227.8 pounds, at 15.9 percent bodyfat. One year later, on May 13, 1995, he weighed 258.3 with only 12.8 percent bodyfat. Joe had gained 30.5 pounds of muscle with a concomitant reduction of 3.2 pounds of bodyfat. During that time he performed a total of 156 training sessions, each lasting less than 50 minutes. Joe's complete departure from his prior habits produced more muscle in 365 days than the previous 2,920 days, or eight years, had.

Thirty pounds of muscle is phenomenal for an entire career, let alone a single year. Logical bodybuilders will ask, "But what about the drugs? It had to be the gear he was on that gave him those kinds of gains." The fact is, Joe was controlled and quite modest in his anabolic/androgenic steroid augmentation. There was no change in his program from the beginning to the end of that period. What's more, the amount and type of chemical additives he used were actually less than what he'd used for the previous five years, and still Joe exploded with more than 30 pounds of muscle. So the question is, What did it?

The answer is, Joe earned his new size. It was real and completely legit, and most of it has turned out to be permanent. Joe still weighs 265, and he's clean as a whistle, unable to compete due to a permanent torso injury. Once he hit the 250-pound mark, he never looked back.

The proteins contained in milk-and-egg supplements accomplish thejob of growth that whey cannot. They maintain the blood levels of glucose and amino acids long enough to maximize the repair process.

It was the continual supply of amino acids and energy that enabled Joe's bodyweight to climb to 258 pounds in a single year.

Joe's incredible 12-month gains were in large part the result of his increasing his protein by 250 percent. The lack of sufficient dietary protein is the single biggest obstacle for 90 percent of all bodybuilders, and it's a self-imposed one. Most bodybuilders simply don't stay on top of their real protein needs, especially when it counts. The sheer amount of whole food it takes to generate 300-plus grams of protein a day is simply too much for most bodybuilders to eat. Enter a key training aid: milk-and-egg proteins.

The peptides found in milk-and-egg proteins contain numerous growth-activating protein fractions, producing more growth than whey protein. The proteins contained in milk-and-egg supplements accomplish the job of growth that whey cannot. They maintain the blood levels of glucose and amino acids long enough to maximize the repair process. It was the continual supply of amino acids and energy that enabled Joe's bodyweight to climb to 258 pounds in a single year. That's amazing when you consider that recent thinking had milk-and-egg supplements lost in whey protein's dust. Not so. There's a bold new world of size waiting for you. So what are you going to do?

Editor's note: Michael J.B. McCormick is a freelance writer and re -searcher. His insider knowledge has helped produce the Gold's Gym Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding (NTC/Contemporary Books, 1998) and the soon-to-be-published series Gold's Gym Essentials of Bodybuilding: Building Bulk, Total Torso Training, Book of Big Arms and Total Leg Training He has been passionately involved in bodybuilding for 25 years.

References

Fern, E.B.; Bielinski, R.N.; and Schultz, Y. (1991). Effects of exaggerated amino acid and protein supply in man. Experientia. 47:168-172.

Kestin, M.; Rouse, I.L.; Corel, R.A.; and Nestle, P.J. (1989). Cardiovascular disease risk factors in free-living men: comparisons of two prudent diets, one based on lacto-ovo vegetarianism and the other allowing lean meat. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 50:280-287.

Park, D.V., and Ioanndes, C. (1994). The effects of nutrition on chemical toxicity. Drug Metabolism Reviews. 26(4):739-765

Prescott, S.L.; Jenner, D.A.; Beilin, L.J.; Margetts, B.A.; and Vando-gen, R. (1988). A randomized control trial of the effect on blood pressure of dietary nonmeat protein vs. meat protein in normotensive carnivores. Clinical Science. 74:665-672.

100 Weight Loss Tips

100 Weight Loss Tips

Make a plan If you want to lose weight, you need to make a plan for it. Planning involves setting your goals both short term and long term ones. With proper planning, you would be able to have an effective guide on the steps that you want to take, towards losing pounds of weight. Aside from that, it would also keep you motivated.

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