The global burden of chronic diseases

Diet and nutrition are important factors in the promotion and maintenance of good health throughout the entire life course. Their role as determinants of chronic NCDs is well established and they therefore occupy a prominent position in prevention activities (1). The latest scientific evidence on the nature and strength of the links between diet and chronic diseases is examined and discussed in detail in the following sections of this report. This section gives an overall view of the current...

Acknowledgements

Special acknowledgement was made by the Consultation to the following individuals who were instrumental in the preparation and proceedings of the meeting Dr C. Nishida, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, WHO, Geneva, Switzerland Dr P. Puska, Director, Department of Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, WHO, Geneva, Switzerland Dr P. Shetty, Chief, Food and Nutrition Division, Rome, Italy and Dr R. Weisel, Food and Nutrition Division, FAO, Rome, Italy. The...

References

Food, nutrition and the prevention of cancer a global perspective. Washington, DC, American Institute for Cancer Research, 1997. 2. Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition. Report of a Joint WHO FAO UNU Expert Consultation. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003 (in press). 3. Fats and oils in human nutrition. Report of a Joint FAO WHO Expert Consultation. Rome, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 1994 (FAO Food and Nutrition...

Diet and dental disease

Nutritional status affects the teeth pre-eruptively, although this influence is much less important than the post-eruptive local effect of diet on the teeth 21 . Deficiencies of vitamins D and A and protein-energy malnutrition have been associated with enamel hypoplasia and salivary gland atrophy which reduces the mouth's ability to buffer plaque acids , which render the teeth more susceptible to decay. In developing countries, in the absence of dietary sugars, undernutrition is not associated...

Trends

The amount of dental decay is measured using the dmf DMF index, a count of the number of teeth or surfaces in a person's mouth that are decayed, missing or filled as a result of caries in primary dentition permanent dentition. An additional dental status indicator is the proportion of the population who are edentulous have no natural teeth . In most low-income countries, the prevalence rate of dental caries is relatively low and more than 90 of caries are untreated. Available data 7 show that...