Sterilizing Your Equipment

You may sterilize your equipment in one of three ways.

  1. Immerse equipment in boiling water for up to five minutes.
  2. Steam utensils for a minimum of five minutes in a large kettle with about two inches of water in the bottom and a tight lid on top. Wooden items such as cheese boards and mats should be boiled or steamed for at least twenty minutes. 3. Plastic (even food grade) equipment should not be boiled or steamed, and should be sterilized with a solution of household bleach (sodium hypochlorite) mixed in the proportion of two tablespoons of bleach to one gallon of water. Bleach may also be used with stainless steel utensils. Be sure that your rinsing is very thorough after using bleach, because a residue of sodium hypochlorite will interfere with the growth of cheesemaking bacteria. Drain the rinsed equipment dry and store it in a clean place.

Just before using them again, all utensils should be resterilized. Dampen a clean cloth in the bleach solution and wipe all counter areas around the place where you will work.

These are some of the things you will need:

  1. Glass or stainless steel measuring cup and spoons.
  2. Dairy thermometer. The thermometer should measure from 20° to 220° F. Before using it, check its accuracy by testing it in boiling water. If it doesn't read exactly 212° F., you'll need to make adjustments when using it.

There are two types of thermometers.

One is the floating glass dairy thermometer, a fine choice for beginners. It floats upright in the milk and is easy to read.

The stainless steel dial thermometer is faster in its response to temperature changes than the glass model. Most have a bracket to hold them at the side of the pot. They have a nine-inch shaft suspended in the milk.

Pots. They should be stainless steel or glass, or enamel-lined, and large enough to hold the amount of milk you will use. Pots. You'll also need a pot larger than the one that contains the milk, to hold water, double-boiler fashion, around the cheese pot. This pot should have a rack, so that water can circulate under the cheese pot. As an alternative, you can put the cheese pot in a sink of hot water. In many

Stainless steel dial thermometer (upper left) reacts fast to temperature changes. Class model is better for beginners.

enough to reach pot bottom.

enough to reach pot bottom.

cases, this is the easiest way to warm milk. When recipes in this book call for heating indirectly, use one of these methods.

  1. Stainless steel stirring spoon or ladle.
  2. Curd knife with a stainless steel blade long enough to reach to the bottom of the smaller pot without immersing the handle.
  3. Cheesecloth. We don't mean the loosely woven mosquito netting fabric sold in most stores under the name of cheesecloth. The real thing is much more closely woven, needs only one layer of thickness for draining cheese, and is strong enough to wash, boil to sterilize, and use over and over again. After being used, cheesecloth should be rinsed clear in cold water, then washed right away with a little bleach added to the wash water occasionally. Boiling the cheesecloth in water to which washing soda has been added will help maintain the freshness of the cloth.
  4. Butter muslin. Slightly closer weave than cheesecloth.
  5. Molds come in many shapes and sizes and are used to contain the curds during the final draining period. When finished, the cheese retains the shape of the mold. Molds come in stainless steel and food-grade plastic. A make-do mold can be
How Make Easy Cheese Mould

made by punching holes in the sides and bottom of a plastic cottage cheese container. Punch holes from the inside.

10. Cheese press. Essential for making a hard cheese. It should be easy to assemble, easy to clean, and have a provision for measuring the amount of pressure being applied to your cheese. Several different presses are available today, or you can build a press for yourself or wheedle one out of your next-door-neighbor's workshop — maybe in exchange for some homemade cheese. Here are some choices.

The Wheeler press, an English model idea! for beginner.

The Wheeler press is made in England from

Press Table Cheese Making

The Wheeler press, an English model idea! for beginner.

hardwood and stainless steel. A table-top model, its pressure is set by hand, and a gauge indicates pounds of pressure on the cheese — up to fifty pounds with the regular springs and up to eighty pounds with heavy-duty springs.

A homemade press can be put together from scraps of wood. Here is a design for a simple press using weights placed on the top board. Weights can be bricks, cement blocks, or a gallon jug filled with water. (A glass gallon jug of water weighs about 10 pounds.)

The Garden Way cider press can be used successfully for cheese pressing if you use a Stain-

Hole s should be roomy enough to slide over dowels

Birch or maple follower lo ffl mold

Birch or maple board, 8" x 8"

Cheese Making Follower

Plastic gallon jar with top and bottom cui off, and holes punched from the Inside

Bricks or gallon jar of water for weight

Birch or maple board

This model is easy to make, and is equally easy io use.

Hole s should be roomy enough to slide over dowels

Birch or maple follower lo ffl mold

Birch or maple board, 8" x 8"

Plastic gallon jar with top and bottom cui off, and holes punched from the Inside

Bricks or gallon jar of water for weight

Birch or maple board

This model is easy to make, and is equally easy io use.

Cider Press Cheese

A mold adapts Garden Way cider press for cheesemaking.

Cheese boards and mats are needed to drain cheeses.

less steel mold inside the base to contain the curds.

1 1. Cheese boards are useful as draining platforms for such cheeses as Camembert, Coulommiers, and Brie. They should be of well-seasoned hardwood and should measure about six inches square.

12. Cheese mats are made from wooden reeds sewn together with cotton twine, or formed in food-grade plastic. They are used to allow the whey to drain away from a cheese. Essential for Coulommiers, Brie, and Camembert, they are also useful for the air-drying period following the pressing of a cheese.

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  • viljo söderström
    How sterilize for making cheese?
    9 years ago
  • Alvisa Cremonesi
    How to sterilize equipment for cheese making?
    9 years ago
  • marco
    How to make easy cheese mould?
    9 years ago
  • HUGO
    How to sterilize cheesecloth?
    9 years ago
  • JOHN
    Can i bleach plastic to sterilize it?
    9 years ago
  • demsas daniel
    How to sterilze for cheese making?
    9 years ago
  • robert beckman
    How to sterilise before making cheese?
    9 years ago
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    9 years ago
  • Layla
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    9 years ago
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    9 years ago
  • natsnet
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    How to sterilize cheesemaking equipment?
    9 years ago
  • sian forbes
    What is cheese making equipment sterilized with?
    9 years ago
  • nicolas mackay
    How to sterilize plastic for cheese making?
    9 years ago
  • DOMENICA
    How the sterilise cheese making equipment?
    9 years ago

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