Bag Cheeses

Many of the soft cheeses in this section are often referred to as bag cheeses. They are made by coagulating milk or cream with cheese starter culture or an acid such as vinegar. Some recipes call for the addition of a small amount of rennet. The resulting curds are then drained in a bag of cheesecloth. Most of these cheeses have the consistency of a soft cheese spread, have a high moisture content, and will keep up to two weeks under refrigeration. These are delicious cheeses which can be...

Whey Cheeses

When you make cheese there is usually a large amount of whey left over. The whey is the clear, greenish liquid which is separated by cooking and draining from the curds. It contains the milk sugar (up to 5 percent), albuminous protein, and minerals of the milk. Whey can be used in cooking and is particularly delicious if used in baking breads. It can also be used as a soup stock. It makes a refreshing summertime drink if served with ice and crushed mint leaves. It is also an excellent feed for...

Soft Cheeses

The cheeses included in this chapter are soft cheeses. They require little equipment to produce, are eaten fresh, and are excellent cheeses for the beginning cheesemaker to attempt. Soft cheeses are high-moisture cheeses. They must be consumed fresh and will keep under refrigeration for several weeks at the most. These are for the most part non-pressed cheeses. They are divided into two categories the bag cheeses and the cottage cheeses. For those recipes in which vinegar is called for in...

Lactic Cheese

This is a delicious, soft, spreadable cheese which keeps for up to 2 weeks under refrigeration. Either cow's or goat's milk may be used. You may add herbs to it in any number of combinations for truly tantalizing taste treats. You can roll it up in a crepe with a fruit sauce for a gourmet dessert. It is easy to make and is ready to eat in 24 to 72 hours. Makes nearly 2 pounds. RIPENING RENNETING AND COAGULATION 24 hours 72 F. 1 gallon whole 4 ounces mesophilic for skim milk cheese starter 1...

How to Prepare starter culture Mesophilic

Sterilize a clean half-gallon canning jar and its cover or two one-quart canning jars with covers by placing them in boiling water for five minutes. 2. Cool them and fill the jar with fresh skim milk, leaving 1 2 inch of head space. Cover the jar tightly with its sterilized lid. 3. Put the jar in your canner or a big, deep pot with the water level at least 1 4 inch over the top of the jar lid. 4. Put the pot on the burner and bring the water to a boil. Note when the water begins to boil, and...

Molding and Draining

The curds are placed into cheese molds. Many of these are a traditional shape and size. The molds are usually placed on wooden reed cheese mats or plastic cheese mats, situated so that the whey will readily drain into the sink. The mats rest on a cheese board because the molds must be flipped over quite often and the cheese boards make this task easier. So, with a mold resting on a cheese mat which is resting on a cheeseboard, you can fill the mold with curd. The mold is filled to the top. Whey...

Soft Goat Cheese

Cheesemaking Moulds

This is a delicious, soft goat's milk cheese. The milk is ripened for a lengthy period with goat cheese starter culture. A very small amount of rennet is also added to the milk. After 18 hours the milk coagulates. It is placed in small goat cheese molds to drain and in 2 days small and delicious 1 1 2- to 2-ounce cheeses are ready for eating. These are firm yet spreadable cheeses which will keep under refrigeration up to 2 weeks. Makes almost 1 pound. 1 ounce mesophilic goat cheese starter...

Coulommiers Cheese

The French style Coulommiers cheese is made with the same recipe as the English style. When the cheese is removed from the Coulommiers mold it is lightly salted and lightly sprayed with a solution of white mold powder. The cheese is aged for 5 days at 45 F. with a relative humidity of 95 percent. After 5 days, small whiskers of white mold will be seen grow ing on the surface of the cheese. Turn the cheese over and age it for 9 more days, at which time the cheese will be covered with a thick...

Rennet

Cheese rennet is not the same as the junket rennet sold in grocery stores. It is possible to curdle milk with junket rennet, but the resulting curd, while it makes a pleasant dessert, will not make an acceptable cheese. Cheese rennet is available as tablets or in liquid form. Rennet that is an animal derivative is extracted from the fourth stomach of a calf or young goat. Its rennet contains an enzyme called rennin which has the property of causing milk to form a solid curd. In the days before...

Ingredients And How To Use Them

Man has taken milk from many animals during the course of history. The familiar cow, goat, and sheep have fed people for centuries, and so have some less common animals such as the yak, camel, buffalo, llama, ass, elk, mare, caribou, and reindeer. Cow's milk and goat's milk are the only ones readily available in this country today, so they will be used in the recipes in this book. If you know how, you can turn milk into cheese without adding a single thing. Over the centuries, man has devised...

Coagulation HOW and

The first step in cheesemaking is to coagulate the milk solids into a curd. There are two basic ways to do this. Each way has many variations used together in combination, the variations are endless. The two methods are acid coagulation and rennet coagulation. You can cause acid coagulation either by adding an acid substance such as lemon juice or vinegar, or by adding a bacterial culture which turns the lactose milk sugar into lactic acid. Both are good ways to make a curd, and each is used...

How to Pasteurize Milk

Pour raw milk into a stainless steel pot and place this pot in another, larger pot containing hot water. Put the double boiler on the burner and bring the water to a boil. To pasteurize, hold milk at 145 F. for 30 minutes. Then coot milk as rapidly as possible in ice water. To pasteurize, hold milk at 145 F. for 30 minutes. Then coot milk as rapidly as possible in ice water. Heat the milk to 145 F., stirring occasionally to insure even heating. Hold the temperature at 145 F. for 30 minutes...

Sterilizing Your Equipment

How Make Easy Cheese Mould

You may sterilize your equipment in one of three ways. 1. Immerse equipment in boiling water for up to five minutes. 2. Steam utensils for a minimum of five minutes in a large kettle with about two inches of water in the bottom and a tight lid on top. Wooden items such as cheese boards and mats should be boiled or steamed for at least twenty minutes. 3. Plastic even food grade equipment should not be boiled or steamed, and should be sterilized with a solution of household bleach sodium...