The Case Studies

Let me demonstrate why they've missed the boat here, with a few case studies. In these case studies, check out column 1 to learn a bit about the athlete and what was accomplished. Then check out columns 2 and 3 to check out what their exercise expenditure and energy intake was like before and after nutritional intervention.

Case Study 1:

National Level Cross-Country Skier, Female, 20y, 5'6"

Before (September 2002)

After (December 2002)

Weight: 160lb Body Fat Percentage: 22% Lean Body Mass: 125 lbs Fat Mass: 35 lbs

Weight: 135lb Body Fat Percentage: 9% Lean Body Mass: 123 lbs Fat Mass: 12 lbs

Exercise Expenditure: ~1200 kcal/day

Exercise Expenditure: ~1200 kcal/day

Energy Intake: ~2500 kcal/day 15% protein 65% carbohydrate 20% fat

Energy Intake: ~4000 kcal/day 35% protein 40% carbohydrate 25% fat

Net result in 12 weeks:

25 lbs lost (23 lbs fat mass, 2 Ibs lean body mass)

Now, in case study #1 you should understand that for this athlete's sport, she was both overweight and overfat. Most of her competitors were competing at body weights of 130-140 at body fat percentages in the 10-12% range. At 160 lbs and 22% fat, it was clear that she needed to lose weight and fat, and that's what happened. She lost 25 total lbs.

What might appear most shocking about this case study is that most folks would have decreased her energy intake to promote fat loss. But we didn't. Note that we increased her energy intake by a whopping 1500 calories per day while exercise expenditure remained the same.

Although you might have expected this increase in calories would lead to weight gain, in the face of this increase she lost 25lbs (while preserving most of her muscle mass). If this flies in the face of your understanding of weight gain and loss, you've got a bit to learn about energy balance. Pay close attention to this chapter.

Now on to case study #2:

Case Study 2:

Novice Weight Lifter, Male, 23y, 5'6"

Before ( August 2003)

After (October 2003)

Weight: 180 lbs Body Fat Percentage: 30% Lean Body Mass: 126 lbs Fat Mass: 54 lbs

Weight: 173 lbs Body Fat Percentage: 20% Lean Body Mass: 138 lbs Fat Mass: 34.5 lbs

Exercise Expenditure: ~200 kcal/day

Exercise Expenditure: ~600kcal/day

Energy Intake: ~1700 kcal/day 21% protein 57% carbohydrate 22% fat

Energy Intake: ~2200 - 2400kcal/day 35 - 40% protein 30 - 35% carbohydrate 30 - 35% fat

Net result in 8 weeks:

7 lbs lost (-19.5 lbs fat mass, +12.5 Ibs lean body mass)

Notice that in case study #2, we increased energy intake by between 500 and 700 per day while increasing exercise expenditure by about 400 per day. Again, since the lifter was weight stable in June, prior to hiring us, you might have expected him to have gained weight or at least remained weight stable during this 8 week program. After all we increased his energy intake more than his exercise expenditure. However, as you can see, he lost 7 lbs. But that's not the most interesting story. During the 8 weeks, he lost almost 20lbs of fat while gaining almost 13 lbs of lean mass.

Now on to case study #3:

Case Study 3:

Mixed Martial Arts Athlete, Male, 35y, 5'10"

Before (June 2004)

After (August 2004)

Weight: 179 lbs Body Fat Percentage: 19% Lean Body Mass: 148.6 lbs Fat Mass: 30.4 lbs

Weight: 187 lbs Body Fat Percentage: 9% Lean Body Mass: 170.2 lbs Fat Mass: 16.8 lbs

Exercise Expenditure: ~300 kcal/day

Exercise Expenditure: ~600kcal/day

Energy Intake: ~1100 - 1500kcal/day 48% protein 25% carbohydrate 27% fat

Energy Intake: ~2400 - 2600kcal/day 26 - 38% protein 28 - 42% carbohydrate 22 - 34% fat

Net result in 8 weeks:

8 lbs weight gain (-13.6 lbs fat mass, +21.6 lbs lean body mass)

Notice that in case study #3, we increased energy intake by between 1100 and 1300 per day while increasing exercise expenditure by only about 300 per day. Again, since the athlete was weight stable in June, prior to hiring us, you might have expected him to have experienced a large gain in mass as well as significant muscle and fat gains. However, as you can see, he gained 8 total lbs, having lost almost 14lbs of fat while gaining nearly 22lbs of lean mass.

While the energy balance equation might have predicted weight gain, it's unlikely that it would have predicted the radical shift in body composition seen in this individual.

Weight Loss New Years Resolution Success

Weight Loss New Years Resolution Success

Sure you haven’t tried this program before but you no doubt aren’t a stranger to the dieting merry go-round that has been plaguing your life up to this point.

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